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Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
>> couric: tonight, the u.s. uses a warplane as the allies keep up the assault on libya and qaddafi remains defiant. >> (translated): we win. we will be victorious in this historical battle. we will not surrender. >> couric: i'm katie couric. also tonight, they survived one disaster, now these japanese have been forced to take shelter against another threat-- nuclear radiation. america's nuclear problem. where to store permanently more than 145 million pounds of spent fuel rods. and college students struggling to make the grade. what some schools are doing to make sure they graduate. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. it's four days into a u.s.-led assault on his military, and libya's moammar qaddafi has lost radar installations, tanks, and naval facilities but not his defiance. he appeared in public tonight in tripoli vowing to fight on and telling supporters he will win and will not surrendered. qaddafi's forces kept up their attacks on civilians today in a n
>> couric: tonight, rebels in libya beat back attempts by the army to retake lost territory. the u.s. steps up the pressure on cadmy to quit, but he's still not giving up. i'm katie couric. also tonight, deep trouble in the midwest. heavy rain and melting snow adds up to flooding that's sweeping through hundreds of homes. are teachers taking a lesson from the labor dispute in wisconsin? a union leader is giving some ground on the red-hot issue of tenure. and the american spirit. an artist who brings to life a world his eyes cannot see. from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. moammar qaddafi's latest offensive was a colossal failure and tonight he's more isolated than ever. troops loyal to qaddafi tried to retake three cities overnight but they were repelled by rebel forces. today in one of those cities, zawiyah, there were celebrations in the streets. the people are firmly in charge and demanding qaddafi go. secretary of state hillary clinton warned that unless he does, libya is at risk of a lo
will lead the operation when the u.s. steps back in the days ahead, though nato is expected to play a major role. meanwhile, a u.s. air force fighter jet crashed today in eastern libya. the two men on board ejected and were rescued. a cbs news poll out tonight finds most americans are following the events in libya closely and nearly seven out of ten approve of the air strikes. mandy clark begins our coverage from the scene of that fighter jet crash. >> reporter: this is all that remains of the american f-15e that went down last night. a steady stream of people came to have a look. saleh saeed saleh, a local farmer, was eager to show us the wreckage. when it it this ground he says it sounded like a rocket exploding. he thought qaddafi's forces were on the attack. officials say the fighter jet crashed because of a mechanical error rather than any enemy fire. it landed east of benghazi which is in the heart of rebel territory. the jet's crew ejected safely. were they okay? were they injured? "the person i saw had minor injuries, just scratches" he says. one of the americans landed in a nearby
. but defense secretary gates said they would be used in libya only for emergency evacuations or to deliver relief supplies. he raised a host of reservations about military intervention. no authorization from either the u.n. or nato, reluctance to tie up force which is might be needed in afghanistan, concerns about fanning anti-american sentiment in the rest of the arab world. >> we also have to think about, frankly, the use of the u.s. military in another country in the middle east. >> reporter: gates said he was unable to gauge the rebels' chances of overthrowing qaddafi. >> it remains to be seen how effectively military leaders who have defected from qaddafi's forces can organize the opposition in the country. >> reporter: secretary of state clinton ticked off future scenarios for libya, and two out of three were bad. >> libya could become a peaceful democracy or it could face protracted civil war or it could descend into chaos. >> reporter: the u.s. and britain are openly talking about setting up a no-fly zone over libya. >> it is not acceptable to have a situation where colonel qaddafi
>> couric: tonight, as allied forces pound targets in libya, the u.s. military insists qaddafi is not a target, but the commander in chief makes it clear... >> it is u.s. policy that qaddafi needs to go. >> couric: i'm katie couric. also tonight, another setback in japan. workers again forced to evacuate as smoke pours from crippled nuclear reactors and concerns grow about the safety of japan's food supply. and another a.t.f. agent tells cbs news the agency encouraged gun dealers in this country to sell weapons to mexican drug cartels. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. for a third straight night, tripoli has come under attack from u.s. and allied forces as they establish a no-fly zone over libya. anti-aircraft fire lit up the sky as moammar qaddafi's army tried to defend against the attack. rebels solidified their control in benghazi and launch and offensive to retake other cities. president obama said today the u.s. will turn over leadership of the opera
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)